Header AD

Why the iPhone 8's facial-recognition technology could be a privacy nightmare

There are few things more personal than a face. Every wrinkle, blemish, and freckle combine to tell a person's story — an interactive and ever-changing map of one's self unspooling over time.

Oh, and if smartphone manufactures have their way, that map will also soon be the preeminent key to your digital life. Unfortunately, that's a problem.

Mashable spoke with about half a dozen experts who expressed concern that the push toward some form of facial-recognition tech will not only present an untold number of privacy concerns, but will actually make our devices less secure. Basically, it's a lose-lose situation — albeit one that the smartphone makers of the world seem all too excited to drag us into.
Companies like Apple, Google, and Qualcomm are charging ahead to make face scans the new biometric we'll rely on for everything from unlocking phones to making digital purchases. Thumbprints, in the form of TouchID and similar tech, have for some time served this purpose, but early reports that the iPhone 8 will abandon this feature in lieu of a facial-recognition technology
called Pearl ID make it clear which way the wind is blowing.
But at what cost? What will it mean when every cellphone stores some sort of detailed digital representation of our (surely) beautiful mugs? Is that really safer than an alphanumeric password? And what will happen when hackers — or government officials — come knocking?
Always on
Of particular note is one rumored feature in the forthcoming iPhone: resting unlock. Written as “accessibility.resting.pearl.unlock.” in the
HomePod firmware leak , the speculation among developers is that this means the iPhone 8 will scan faces even when the device is lying face up on a table .
Basically, you won't even need to touch your phone to unlock it (or make a purchase).
Sounds cool, right? But for that to work, facial recognition would need to be always on, a phrase that concerns Electronic Frontier Foundation Senior Staff Attorney Adam Schwartz.
"In general, 'always on' products raise special concerns," Schwartz explained over the phone. He emphasized that "always on" features translate to always gathering information.
Why the iPhone 8's facial-recognition technology could be a privacy nightmare Why the iPhone 8's facial-recognition technology could be a privacy nightmare Reviewed by ThankGod Okoye on August 28, 2017 Rating: 5